Never Knows Best

reila~ 19.az.

"your tits are perfect bless you"

Asked by lifesatravisty

you’re alright

"You get three wishes. However, whatever you wish for comes out your butt... What do you wish for..."

Asked by jestfatality

WHAT, my wishes aren’t items

Reblogged from karlellis

bobl0blawslawbl0g:

Best

(Source: tibets)

Reblogged from wow-sugoii

I have this bra

(Source: honest-babee)

Reblogged from 6eyonce

I’m nobody’s ex… If we break up I don’t know you

(Source: thekatierodriguez)

diglettdevious:

phototoartguy:

Surprising Fly By
Photography by Elena Murzyn, Woodinville, WA, USA

me too

Reblogged from shuckl

diglettdevious:

phototoartguy:

Surprising Fly By

Photography by Elena Murzyn, Woodinville, WA, USA

me too

Reblogged from fyeahsquareenix

chokeonpaopu:

destiny island trio color pallete
brokensilence137:

dynaroo:



I think this bird got confused when someone told him he belonged in the sky.
He decided to be the sky instead.

Reblogged from shuckl

brokensilence137:

dynaroo:

image

I think this bird got confused when someone told him he belonged in the sky.

He decided to be the sky instead.

Reblogged from karlellis

yakfrost:

avril lavigne is 29 that’s too fucking old to be goin through a weaboo phase

Reblogged from itscurtiss

oc34neyes:

snoopdogg420:

heres that fucing cat lookin like its wearing circle lenses 

i didnt know a cat could be prettier than most human beings. 

(Source: annajossi)

Reblogged from saammhmm

alekshdfilms:

one time i forced my mom to play pokemon for at least half an hour and all she did was catch a butterfree and name it lowfat

Reblogged from weloveshortvideos

(Source: iamjacobbb)

andrewfishman:

Ai Weiwei, “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn,” 1995
An astonishingly irreverent piece of work.  This triptych features the artist dropping a Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD) in three photographs.  
When questioned about the work, he suggested that the piece was about industry: “[The urn] was industry then and is industry now.”  His statement, therefore, was that the urn was just a cheap pot two thousand years ago, and the reverence we feel toward it is artificial.  One critic wrote: “In other words, for all the aura of preciousness acquired by the accretion of time (and skillful marketing), this vessel is the Iron Age equivalent of a flower pot from K-Mart and if one were to smash the latter a few millennia from now, would it be an occasion for tears?”
However, the not-so-subtle political undertone is clear.  This piece was about destroying the notion that everything that is old is good…including the traditions and cultures of China.  For Ai Weiwei, this triptych represents a moment in which culture suddenly shifts (sometimes violently), shattering the old and outdated to make room for the new.  

Reblogged from sle4zy

andrewfishman:

Ai Weiwei, “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn,” 1995

An astonishingly irreverent piece of work.  This triptych features the artist dropping a Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD) in three photographs.  

When questioned about the work, he suggested that the piece was about industry: “[The urn] was industry then and is industry now.”  His statement, therefore, was that the urn was just a cheap pot two thousand years ago, and the reverence we feel toward it is artificial.  One critic wrote: “In other words, for all the aura of preciousness acquired by the accretion of time (and skillful marketing), this vessel is the Iron Age equivalent of a flower pot from K-Mart and if one were to smash the latter a few millennia from now, would it be an occasion for tears?”

However, the not-so-subtle political undertone is clear.  This piece was about destroying the notion that everything that is old is good…including the traditions and cultures of China.  For Ai Weiwei, this triptych represents a moment in which culture suddenly shifts (sometimes violently), shattering the old and outdated to make room for the new.  

Reblogged from facking

we-want-porn:

-Jay

(Source: lu-rainhadosexo)

Reblogged from facking

(Source: shoujonotes)